Mr. Checkpoint App Aims to Reduce Police Abusing Their Power

In an effort to reduce police brutality, the MrCheckpoint app maps where cops hide out for checkpoints — and lets users report if officers are abusing their power. 🚨

Mr. Checkpoint Aims to Map Police Violence and Abuses

To expose police violence and abuses, Sennett Devermont created Mr. Checkpoint to fight for your rights through activism. He first started the service to report the exact locations of DUI checkpoints across California. From Rodney King to Sandra Bland, the proliferation of video evidence in police activity has played a major role in exposing police brutality, and the racial disparities in the U.S. criminal justice system. 1,165 people were killed by police in America in 2018 according to Mapping Police Violence. 99% of the officers involved in the killings were not charged with a crime based on data from the Washington Post.

In 2011, Devermont was wrongfully arrested for a DUI. Thanks to a recording and a blood test, he won a $70,000 settlement. Since 2011, the service has shifted from identifying checkpoints to holding law enforcement accountable.

Sennett states his cause, “I'm from Los Angeles, born and raised, and you know FTP, you know, really is known as f--- (bleep) the police, and I'm not for saying that, I don't think it's productive and I don't think anything positive happens from that, but I think that saying that's so popular, comes from a real pain that people have felt with police. And so what I would say is AFTP: Always Film The Police, and the idea is that filming police is a First Amendment right, because they're public servants.”

Mr. Checkpoint is now aiming to go nationwide with the new technology innovation app for law justice. Users will not only be able to report on checkpoints, but also upload pictures and videos of encounters with law enforcement, that will be shared and rated by the public.

Brut.

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Brut.